With starvation and obesity posing two of global society’s most pressing issues, and with a world population that’s forecast to soar to more than 9 billion people by 2050, further intensifying the pressure on precious resources, the current human diet is not sustainable, agreed a panel of experts at the recent edition of the annual Food Matters conference in London.

Leaders from science, health, food manufacturing and the restaurant trade took part in a special seminar titled “Putting sustainable diets at the top of the menu,” and quickly acknowledged that delivering food security in a sustainable way undoubtedly presented one of the herculean tasks of the modern age.

“The reason we are talking about a ‘sustainable diet’ is because our diet is not sustainable. We are now 7.5 billion people, and more than 800 million are malnourished, while the overweight and obese account for 2 billion. A sustainable food system is one that provides food security without compromising the environment. What we have today doesn’t work,” said Alexandre Meybeck, senior policy on agriculture, environment and climate change at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Read the article.